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Tag Archives: Medical Relief Efforts

Small candles that burn in the darkest places.

It’s hard to fathom. I mean I’ve been to cities around the world but this is something immensely different. Dhaka is a city of 16-20 million people. It’s a mass of humanity that breathes and lives like one gigantic organism. There are areas with a density of 100,000 people per square kilometer. It continues to grow at an alarming rate of 4% per year with estimates of 25 million by 2025. It is considered to be the rickshaw capital of the world with approximately 400,000 rickshaws on the street every day. The city’s per capita income is about $3,100 per year, the lowest of the mega cities in the world.

Yet amongst the poverty and the density is a bright light. A candle of hope. Here, a modern day Mother Theresa exists… our hostess, Zahida.

They say one of the possible origins of the name Dhaka is from the hidden goddess Dhakeshwari. Well we may have found that hidden goddess in Zahida, the leader of our partner in Bangladesh, the SAJIDA Foundation. She welcomed us with open arms and beams with pride when she greets us at the airport and takes us for the tours of their operations.

We start with a visit with the low-income families SAJIDA provides business loans for. There are 10 families living in an area the size of two Tim Horton coffee shops.  A dozen or more woman are gathered in a small hut waiting for the finances and showing us products that they have made with funding from the business loan. It’s an impressive site. These are empowered women in a developing country.

We move then to the hospital and are greeted by familiar faces with big smiles. On the wall of the hospital is a big poster of Team Broken Earth and the SAJIDA Foundation working together during our last visit.

For a moment, it feels good to see how far we have come. But that lasts just a moment…

We move through the dense streets packed with cars, rickshaws and humanity piled on to each other. There is some order in this chaos. The traffic is so intense that it’s impossible to tell when you are moving and what direction you are inching in. Six lanes deep at times with not enough space to fit a playing card between the next vehicles. The temperature is north of 45 degrees with the humidity but we’re lucky to have some AC.

The final trip of the day is the most emotional. We went to visit the “pavement dwellers.” At best guess, there are over 40,000 of these unidentified, homeless, forgotten people. Many are children.  I have been to see them before, but this time is no easier. There is a lump in my throat that gets more intense as we walk into the building. On the first floor there are 20 or so adolescent males from 10-13 years old who are being taught basic life skills.  They wave and smile.  They are all orphans, and live on the streets with no government ID, no recognition that they even exist. In fact, if it wasn’t for our hosts, no one may know they exist at all.  They have no one and nothing to call their own, yet they smile and wave.  They will leave this building in an hour or so and go to the streets the same way any of our kids would head home after to school. These terrible streets are their homes. There’s a chill that comes with that realization.

We go upstairs to the next floor and there are dozens of 5-6 year olds who are all in one room, waiting for us. They have smiles as big as my 5-year-old son’s. They are there because they have been beaten, neglected, or abused. Some have single mothers who are working outside and will be back for them. Some of the young ones are able to stay over night. Others will have to leave and find a dry corner of pavement to lay their heads – if they’re lucky. Lucky. There’s that word again. There’s nothing lucky about this.

Five year olds. Orphaned. Abandoned and living on the street. Words cannot do justice to the feeling it creates deep inside of you. A combination of guilt, nervousness, anger, and grief. It’s just not right. We live in the shadow of such gigantic divides. We have to do better. I believe that we are all part of something bigger; we are all in this together. When a five year old lays her head on the pavement in Bangladesh at night, we should all feel it. When an adolescent boy cries for help and no one responds in the streets of Dhaka, we should hear it. Isn’t that what it means to be part of a global community?

The five year olds snap me out of it with a song. Five year olds are five year olds no matter where they are. Big smiles, and dancing carefree. It brings a smile to all of our faces. Despite the poverty, despite the fact that some will have to leave the building tonight and come back tomorrow they smile. There is something familiar about their smiles, their eyes. It’s more than childhood innocence. It’s hope. And in hope, they’re richer than any of us.

It has been six years since I first traveled to Haiti. Six years since a little girl’s smile changed my life. You may have heard me talk about her before. She was a girl of about twelve who lost her parents in the earthquake and was now the caregiver for her injured grandfather. She provided him with the care he needed. She walked him to the OR and waited patiently in the waiting areas while we fixed his hip. Then she shook my hand with a smile. She carried herself as someone way beyond her young years. It was that smile and the hope in her eyes that compelled me to act. You could see it in her eyes, hope. Hope that there would be better days. Hope that the world could and will be a better place. She would be a young woman now. I’m not sure much has changed, maybe it hasn’t. But more than anything, I want to believe she still has the courage to have that smile and, most importantly, that hope.

Yesterday was the first time in a while since I have seen those eyes and that hope in someone else. Despite the adversity, the poverty, the abuse, the chaos, a smile and eyes filled with hope. It’s a testament to people like Zahida, determined to make a difference. To keep that candle of hope burning. We can see it from here. It’s like a lantern. It guides us. It’s carried in the hearts of everyone on Team Broken Earth as we move inch-by-inch closer to the change we all hope is possible in this world.

Best,

Andrew

 
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Posted by on May 25, 2016 in Uncategorized

 

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Things to do during the longest winter since the Ice Age.

Is it me or does this winter feel like it has been three winters long?

Suddenly the balmy heat of Port-au-Prince doesn’t seem so bad!

It’s been a crazy-busy year so far and yet it feels we’re just getting started. So much on the go. So much coming up. It’s exciting. It’s intimidating. But I wouldn’t have it any other way.

So far the New Year has meant new partnerships and new teams.

After Dr. Barter’s successful rural trip last year, there’s now a second team in  Haiti with Haiti Village Health. This is an amazing development as we start to grow our mission throughout the country. More reach means more people receive badly needed medical attention.

Speaking of teams, our roster continues to grow. We’ve got a Vancouver team ready to go in the spring and an Ottawa team planning a trip for later in the year. This is the momentum we all want. More people getting involved means we do so much more for the people of Haiti.

How does it all play out? Well, I love the way our March mission is working out. The Newfoundland team will start with a trip at the end of the month. We then hand things over to our Halifax team for their mission. The Halifax teams then gives the puck to a specialized Calgary team that’ll handle tendon transfers specifically. Then the team from Vancouver in May.  Four teams working a quasi relay race of medical attention. I love it.

The last few months have also meant a lot of speaking engagements and interviews to continue getting the word out on what Broken Earth is doing and wants to do in Haiti. The media has been so supportive of Broken Earth and we’ve had amazing write-ups in Halifax and Calgary, which are bringing nation-wide coverage of our endeavor. In fact, on our next mission to Haiti we will be bringing the CBC’s Anthony Germain. He’s been a great supporter of our work and I’m hoping this trip will give him a first-hand look as to why we are all driven to go back, again and again.

In Haiti, we are set to launch our first formal education course in May with approval of the location and partnerships with Haiti’s residency programs.  It will be an amazing event with orthopedic surgeons from across the country waving the Team Broken earth flag!

Well, it’s only March. Just a couple of weeks away from the next trip. It’s funny how time just races by when you need it most. Lots of planning to do. You’ve all probably seen the announcement for Rock Op 2014. Gonna be another amazing event and I want to see ALL of you there! The Once will take the stage and where else can you taste the talents of the best chefs in the city all under one roof?!

Speaking of fundraising, we’ve been getting a lot of support from some truly amazing people.  Dedicated nurses organizing everything from pubs nights to fitness events. Every bit counts!

In the meantime, the Ted X talk that Dr. Bridger and I gave is now online for all to view. To be honest, I haven’t been able to watch it yet… it’s just too strange to watch yourself!  That being said I am scheduled to speak for what seems like 100 times over the next few months as the Honorary chair of Volunteer week.  I am super excited about it and looking forward to spreading the Broken Earth story to all of the other exceptional volunteers in Newfoundland and Labrador.

You can check out the TEDx video here…

Take care and make sure to get your Rock Op tickets early! If the last two years are any example, it’ll sell out quick!

Best,

Andrew

 

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Posted by on March 20, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Day 3: the medical MacGyver, teaching & the possibility of clean water.

Last night was one of those surreal nights here. I’ve heard Haiti often referred to as the “land of a million orphans” but there are moments when the weight of that statement hits you.

Late last night, Mary O’Brien, one of our pediatric nurses and Dr. Melissa Angel ended up treating an abandoned orphan. This little one was obviously terrified but it didn’t take long for her to realize she was safe now. Mary and Melissa comforted her and helped arrange the social work this morning.

Take a moment and go hug your kids.

That’s how the day started.

Another busy day in pediatrics. Leigh Anne and Natalie diligently work away treating a variety of infectious diseases including meningitis. They haven’t stopped yet. It can be a real eye-opener, especially if it’s your first trip. Nurses Carla Pitman and Susan Morgan are in that boat. They’re driven by what they see. This place changes you. Humbles you as to how lucky we are in great north.

Still missing his luggage, Patrick Clarke went all MacGyver on us. He helped fix the ultrasound, the anesthesia machine and the downed CT scan… all with duct tape and some LEGOs. Kidding. Pat-of-all-trades.

Spent part of the afternoon helping to teach Haitian medical students with the local ortho surgeons. These guys will change lives here.

Tomorrow’s gonna be another big day. Thanks to our good friend Brendan Paddick, clean water engineers from Columbus Communications will be doing a site survey at the hospital for us. What a difference that’s gonna make. And tomorrow night the team’s been invited to a BBQ at the Canadian consulate. Nice little break there.

Night’s coming on. It’s tough to think about what lies out beyond the walls of the hospital. Sadly, most nights we have to turn people away because we’re way beyond capacity. You end up feeling a little guilty but that drives you to do that much more the next day.

G’night all.

– Andrew

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Posted by on April 30, 2013 in Mission 9

 

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